Diindolylmethane (DIM) Information Resource Center

An Initiative of Faculty Members and Research Fellows at the

University of California at Berkeley

 

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Information Resource Center

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Information Resource Center

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Information Resource Center

 

          Home / Formation / Molecular Biology / Clinical Applications / Research at Cal / References

Molecular Biology of Diindolylmethane (DIM)

Diindolylmethane is unique in the biomedical field in that it exhibits multiple distinct and complementary anti-cancer and immune modulating properties. These distinct and complementary modes of action are among the reasons why the National Cancer Institute has begun clinical trials of DIM as a natural therapeutic for multiple forms of cancer.

 

Overview of DIM's Anti-Cancer and Immune Modulating Properties

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Biological Activities

 

Medical epidemiologists believe that the lower risk of cancer attributed to people who consume a lot of Brassica vegetables is in part due to Diindolylmethane's numerous anti-cancer properties. In 2001, biomedical investigators published their findings regarding Brassica vegetables and breast cancer in the Journal of the American Medical Association.1 In it they discussed their finding that women who consume just one serving of Brassica vegetables per week exhibit a 40% reduction in the risk of breast cancer development relative to those who consume very little of this vegetable group in their diet. In 2007, scientists at the National Cancer Institute published their finding that men who consume just one serving of Cruciferous (Brassica) vegetables per week reduce their risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer by up to 52%.2 Interestingly enough, in this study, no other vegetable group appeared to provide a statistically significant risk reduction for prostate cancer.

 

Other phytonutrients in Brassica vegetables that have also been shown to have anti-cancer properties include Sulforaphane and Selenium.

 

1. Brassica Vegetables and Breast Cancer Risk. Terry P, Wolk A, Persson I, Magnusson C, JAMA 2001 285 (23): 2975-2976

 

2. Prospective Study of Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Risk of Prostate Cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2007 Jul 24; Krish VA, Peters U, Mayne ST, Subar AF, Chatterjee N, Johnson CC, Hayes RB

 


 

Sampling of Scientific Data on Diindolylmethane (DIM)

 

DIM In-Vivo Affect on Key Immune Modulating Cytokines

 

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Immune Modulation Graphs

 

In this study DIM was administered orally at 30mg/kg of body weight.

 


 

DIM In-Vivo Anti-Viral Activity Through Immune Modulation

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Antiviral Activity

(Reference: Xue L, Pestka J, Maoxiang L, Firestone GL, Bjeldanes LF, 3,3′-Diindolylmethane stimulates murine immune function in vitro and in vivo, Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, published online, 8-20-07.)

 


 

DIM Stimulates Transcript Expression of Interferon-γ

and Related Genes in Human Breast Cancer Cells

 

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Interferon Gamma Receptor Induction

 


 

Activation and Potentiation of Interferon-γ by DIM:

Stimulation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Production

 

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Interferon Gamma Receptor Induction

 


 

Potentiation of Interferon-γ Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest by DIM

in Human Breast Cancer Cells

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Synergy with Interferon Gamma


 

DIM Enhances Interferon-γ Induced Expression of MHC-I Complex

in Human Breast Cancer Cells

 

(Please Note Section D of this figure. DIM may be used as an adjuvant to IFN-γ treatment

models because of this unique synergistic effect on the MHC-I Complex. This synergy is

currently under investigation for HIV, HPV, Hepatitis and multiple forms of cancer.)

 

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Synergy with Interferon-Gamma

 

(Reference: Riby JE, Xue L, Chatterji U, Bjeldanes EL, Firestone GL, Bjeldanes LF, Activation and Potentiation of Interferon-(gamma) Signaling by 3,3'-Diindolylmethane in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells, Molecular Pharmacology, Nov. 2, 2005)

 


 

DIM and Taxol Synergize to Promote Apoptosis

 

Diindolylmethane (DIM) and Taxol Synergize to Promote Apoptosis  Diindolylmethane (DIM) and Taxol Synergize to Promote Apoptosis

 

Diindolylmethane (DIM) and Taxol Synergize to Promote Apoptosis   Diindolylmethane (DIM) and Taxol Synergize to Promote Apoptosis

(Reference: K. McGuire, N. Ngoubilly, M. Neavyn, S. Lanza-Jacoby. 3,3′-Diindolylmethane and Paclitaxel Act Synergistically to Promote Apoptosis in HER2/Neu Human Breast Cancer Cells. Journal of Surgical Research, 2006 May 15;132(2):208-13. Department of Surgery, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107)

 


 

In-Vivo Animal Study: DIM Inhibits DMBA-induced

Mammary Tumor Growth

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Inhibits Mammary Tumor Growth

(Reference: Chen I, McDougal A, Wang F, Safe S, Carcinogenesis, vol. 19, no.9. pp.1631. 1998.)

 


 

In-Vivo Animal Study: DIM Inhibits Growth of Human Mammary

Tumor Cells in Athymic Mice

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Inhibits Mammary Tumor Growth

(Reference: Chang X., Tou J.C., Hong C., Kim H.A., Riby J.E., Firestone G.L., Bjeldanes L.F., Diindolylmethane inhibits angiogenesis and the growth of transplantable human breast carcinoma in athymic mice, Carcinogenesis, Janurary 2005, pp.771-778.)

 

Diindolylmethane (DIM) Information Resource Center

share this button

2007-2015 Diindolylmethane Information Resource Center